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  • Carnivore Featured Article Carnivore Carnivore

    Introduction The term carnivore is used in a variety of ways. The general ecological definition of a carnivore is an organism that feeds on animals, as opposed to feeding... More »

  • Spratly Islands Featured Article Spratly Islands Spratly Islands

    The Spratly Islands consist of more than 150 small islands or reefs scattered over a sea area of nearly 360,000 square kilometres in the South China Sea, about two-thirds of the... More »

  • Carpenter bee Featured Article Carpenter bee Carpenter bee

    This hexapod (six-legged) insect is a bee in the subfamily Xylocoinae of either the genus Ceratina or Xylocopa that makes its nest in wood or plant stems. Along... More »

  • Dugong Featured Article Dugong Dugong

    The Dugong, often referred to as the sea cow, is actually more closely related to elephants than to the bovine namesake.  Throughout much of their range, the Dugong has... More »

  • Limestone Featured Article Limestone Limestone

      Limestone  is a sedimentary rock whose chief mineral component is calcite (calcium carbonate: CaCO3). Limestone can be formed by precipitation of calcite... More »

  • Gymnosperm Featured Article Gymnosperm Gymnosperm

    A gymnosperm is one of a number of non-flowering seed bearing vegetation species, including conifers, cycads, Ginkgo and Gnetales.  These species arose first in the... More »

  • Marine microbes Featured Article Marine microbes Marine microbes

    Marine microbes is a term that encompasses all microscopic organisms generally found in saltwater. Most micro-organisms are acellular and fall into the major categories of... More »

  • DNA Featured Article DNA DNA

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a long chain organic molecule that contains the coding for all metabolic and reproductive processes of all living organisms, save for certain... More »

Recently Updated
Mediterranean woodlands and forests Last Updated on 2016-02-05 20:54:08 WWF Terrestrial Ecoregions Collection The Mediterranean woodlands and forests ecoregion stretches from the coastal plains to the hills of northern Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia, and eventually surrounds the Atlas Mountains. To the north is the Alboran Sea, the westernmost element of the Mediterranean Sea. The variety of substrates and climates leads to a diverse mix of vegetation including holm oak forests, cork oak forests, wild olive and carob woodlands, as well as extensive Berber thuya forest. This old, endemic North African conifer species is representative of the great diversity and endemism of both flora and fauna in this ecoregion. Reptile diversity is high and the region harbors charismatic large mammals, including the rare and endangered Barbary leopard. Unfortunately, this region contains expanding human populations and is enduring... More »
Europa Island Last Updated on 2016-01-13 02:13:53 Europa Island located in the southern Mozambique Channel, between Madagascar and Mozambique. Europa Island is about 100 kilometers (km) southeast of Bassas da India. Europa, with 30 square kilometers (km2) of land area, is 6-7 km in diameter with a maximum altitude of 6 meters (m). Its shallow lagoon (generally 1 m deep) is open to the sea at one side, and covers about 900 hectares (ha), including some 700 ha of mangrove swamp that is particularly extensive to the south. The lagoon is almost entirely exposed at low tide, and supports sparse seagrass beds at its outflow. These are dominated by Thalassodendron and Halodule species. Another smaller lagoon supports a mixed vegetation. The rim of the atoll is a karst is also a quantity of exposed coral rock and extensive sand dunes and rubble to the southwest. Europa is estimated to have formed about 90,000 years ago. It is... More »
Marine microbes Last Updated on 2016-01-01 20:01:01 Marine microbes is a term that encompasses all microscopic organisms generally found in saltwater. Most micro-organisms are acellular and fall into the major categories of viruses, prokaryotes (bacteria), and protists, groups which differ considerably in biological characteristics. While representatives of these groups are found in virtually everywhere in marine waters, and they play nearly every ecological role imaginable, their most important function is that they form the base of the food chain in marine ecosystems. Well-known to us as disease-causing agents, viruses are deceivingly simple organisms, little more than some nucleic acid within a protein container. They are 'parasitic particles' most about 40 nanometers in characteristic size. Viruses attach themselves to a living cell and inject a dose of nucleic acid into the cell; the injected nucleic acid... More »
India Last Updated on 2015-09-01 11:18:16 India is one of the major nations of the world. With 1,205 million people, it has the second largest population (after China). It is bordered by the Arabian Sea and Indian Ocean in the south, east and west. To the North, it borders Bangladesh, Bhutan, Myanmar (Burma), China, Nepal, and Pakistan. India has a long and complex history reflected in its intricate mixture of ethnic groups, languages and cultures. While, density populated, India is home to a wide range of varied ecoregions with important biodiversity.  Its major environmental issues include: deforestation; soil erosion; overgrazing; desertification; air pollution from industrial effluents and vehicle emissions; water pollution from raw sewage and runoff of agricultural pesticides and herbicides; tap water is not potable throughout the country; and, its huge and growing... More »
Nuclear power Last Updated on 2015-08-28 08:36:17 Nuclear power is the generation of electricity from controlled reactions within the nucleii of atoms that release energy used to boil water, the steam from which drives a turbine to generate electricity . All commercial nuclear plants presently rely upon nuclear fission reactions. As of 2010, approximately 14 percent of the world's electricity was derived from nuclear power, chiefly centered in the United States (with 31% of the world's total nuclear power capacity), France (16%), and Japan (10%). The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) reports that, as of November 21, 2012, there are 437 nuclear power reactors in operation in 30 countries, plus Taiwan. Another 64 reactors under construction in 14 countries which if operational today would increase the worldwide electrical generation capacity of nuclear power by 17%. One hundred and forty reactors have been permanently... More »