Geography

Geography is the study of natural and human constructed phenomena from a spatial perspective. Geography has two main sub disciplines:

  • Human geography includes such subjects as demography, human settlements, transportation, recreation and tourism, resources, religion, social traditions, human migration, agriculture, urban systems, and economic activities
     
  • Physical geography  is concerned with the study of the Earth’s atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere from theoretical and applied viewpoints.

Sometimes the disciplines of human and physical geography combine knowledge to create a more holistic synthesis.

  • Borneo peat swamp forests Featured Article Borneo peat swamp forests Borneo peat swamp forests

    WWF Terrestrial Ecoregions Collection Although the Borneo peat swamp forests are not as biodiverse as neighbouring lowland rainforests, the... More »

  • Terrestrial biome Featured Article Terrestrial biome Terrestrial biome

    Introduction Many places on Earth share similar climatic conditions despite being found in geographically different areas. As a result of natural selection, comparable... More »

  • English Channel Featured Article English Channel English Channel

    The English Channel is that saline water body that connects the North Sea to the Celtic Sea. It is bounded on the north by England and on the south by France. This water body... More »

  • Northern California coast Featured Article Northern California coast Northern California coast

    The Northern California coast section encompasses diverse topography including mountains, hills, valleys and plains in the Northern California Coast Ranges and small parts of... More »

  • Sea of the Hebrides Featured Article Sea of the Hebrides Sea of the Hebrides

    The Sea of the Hebrides is an element of the North Atlantic Ocean, located off the western coast of Scotland, separating the Scottish mainland and the northern Inner Hebrides... More »

  • Guatemala Featured Article Guatemala Guatemala

    Guatemala is a Central American nation of fourteen million people located between Mexico, El Salvador, Honduras and Belize. Its western coast fronts to Pacific Ocean and... More »

  • Lake Urmia Featured Article Lake Urmia Lake Urmia

    Lake Urmia is a shallow perennial inland salt water body in northwestern Iran. This lake is the second largest in the Middle East, measuring roughly 5000 square kilometers in... More »

  • Don Juan Pond Featured Article Don Juan Pond Don Juan Pond

    The Don Juan Pond in western Antarctica is the most saline water body on Earth, at approximately twelve to thirteen times the salinity level of other typical seas of the world.... More »

Recently Updated
India Last Updated on 2015-09-01 11:18:16 India is one of the major nations of the world. With 1,205 million people, it has the second largest population (after China). It is bordered by the Arabian Sea and Indian Ocean in the south, east and west. To the North, it borders Bangladesh, Bhutan, Myanmar (Burma), China, Nepal, and Pakistan. India has a long and complex history reflected in its intricate mixture of ethnic groups, languages and cultures. While, density populated, India is home to a wide range of varied ecoregions with important biodiversity.  Its major environmental issues include: deforestation; soil erosion; overgrazing; desertification; air pollution from industrial effluents and vehicle emissions; water pollution from raw sewage and runoff of agricultural pesticides and herbicides; tap water is not potable throughout the country; and, its huge and growing... More »
Comoros Last Updated on 2015-07-18 16:21:28 Comoros is a nation of 730,000 people composed of three islands (Ngazidja or "Grande Comore", Mwali  or "Mohéli" and Nzwani or "Anjouan") in the Indian Ocean, at the northern mouth of the Mozambique Channel, about two-thirds of the way between northern Madagascar and northern Mozambique. Comoros also claims a fourth island Mayotte or "Mahoré" which is under French administration. One of the world's poorest countries, the islands comprising Comoros  have inadequate transportation links, a young and rapidly increasing population, and few natural resources. The country is not self-sufficient in food production. Rice, the main staple, accounts for the bulk of imports. The low educational level of the labor force contributes to a subsistence level of economic activity, high unemployment, and a... More »
Kaokoveld Desert Last Updated on 2015-07-14 14:38:13 WWF Terrestrial Ecoregions Collection The Kaokoveld Desert represents the northern area of the vast Namib Desert. It is a harsh, arid landscape of rugged mountains, gravel plains and shifting sand dunes. Surface water is scarce, with only one perennial river flowing through the region, the Kunene River. However, the dry riverbeds transecting the area are the lifelines of the desert. They are well vegetated and are home to large mammals such as African Elephant, Black Rhino and Giraffe. The remainder of the landscape is poorly vegetated and extremely arid. Coastal fogs allow a range of interesting, desert-adapted animal species to survive in this low-rainfall environment. The relict gymnosperm Welwitschia mirabilis, which represents the sole surviving member of its family, is found throughout the ecoregion. The Kaokoveld Desert is well protected in... More »
Highveld grasslands Last Updated on 2015-07-07 21:46:02 WWF Terrestrial Ecoregions Collection Highveld grasslands ecoregion covers a large portion of west-central South Africa. Grasslands all over the world have experienced dramatic habitat destruction as a result of anthropogenic changes. The Highveld grasslands are no exception, with agriculture severely fragmenting this once-expansive region. This ecoregion now provides the last remaining stronghold of a number of grassland species that have suffered major reductions in abundance in the grassland biome, and which are consequently threatened with extinction (e.g. the Blue Crane (Anthropoides paradisea). There is a relatively biodiverse vertebrate fauna, with 608 taxa recorded. This ecoregion is part of the Montane Grasslands and Shrublands biome, within the Afrotropics Realm. The ecoregion draws its name from the high interior plateau known as... More »
East African montane moorlands Last Updated on 2015-07-02 10:29:19 The East African montane moorlands is a relatively small alpine ecoregion in eastern Africa. The habitat is virtually treeless since it occupies a zone above the treeline. This ecoregion, classified as an element of the montane grasslands and scrublands biome, has a land area measuring only about 1300 square miles. The ecoregion, lying at the upper zones of ancient volcanoes, exhibits low species richness of higher level faunal organisms, but manifests moderate plant and animal endemism, including support of certain extremophiles. There is particularly high endemism among amphibians and small mammals of the ecoregion. Many of the plant species that occur in the ecoregion have adapted interesting morphological features to allow survival in the extreme cold here. The upper elevations of the ecoregion have persistent glacial cover. Although some of the ecoregion (e.g. Mount Kilamanjaro)... More »