Forests

Forests are one of the most important biomes on earth. They provide a wide range of “ecosystem services,” from watershed protection and carbon absorption to renewable energy and timber production.

Important reservoirs of plant and animal biodiversity in locations ranging from China to Latin America and many places in between, forests provide key components of the environmental, social and economic well-being of societies around the world.

  • Agriculture II Featured Photo Gallery Agriculture II Agriculture II

    Humans began to cultivate food crops about 10,000 years ago. Prior to that time, hunter-gatherers secured their food as they traveled in the nearby environment. When they... More »

  • Veracruz moist forests Featured Article Veracruz moist forests Veracruz moist forests

    WWF Terrestrial Ecoregions Collection The Veracruz moist forests is an ecoregion widely acknowledged as a place of great importance for many... More »

  • Agriculture I Featured Photo Gallery Agriculture I Agriculture I

    Humans began to cultivate food crops about 10,000 years ago. Prior to that time, hunter-gatherers secured their food as they traveled in the nearby environment. When they... More »

  • Douglas-fir Featured Article Douglas-fir Douglas-fir

    The Douglas-fir (scientific name: Pseudotsuga) is a genus of tree that includes ar least five species found in North America and Asia: Scientific... More »

  • Urban forest loss Featured News Article Urban forest loss Urban forest loss

    New Orleans, Albuquerque, and Houston are among U.S. urban areas that are losing their trees. Nation’s urban forests losing ground National results indicate that... More »

  • Southern Hudson Bay taiga Featured Article Southern Hudson Bay taiga Southern Hudson Bay taiga

    WWF Terrestrial Ecoregions Collection The Southern Hudson Bay taiga ecoregion within Canada extends along the lowlands adjacent to Hudson Bay... More »

  • Alberta Mountain forests Featured Article Alberta Mountain forests Alberta Mountain forests

    WWF Terrestrial Ecoregions Collection The Alberta Mountain forests ecoregion lies entirely within Canada and almost fully within the province... More »

  • Yellow Fever Featured Article Yellow Fever Yellow Fever

    Introduction Centers for Disease Control and Prevention     Yellow fever is a viral disease that is transmitted to humans... More »

Recently Updated
Alberta Mountain forests Last Updated on 2015-01-16 14:48:16 WWF Terrestrial Ecoregions Collection The Alberta Mountain forests ecoregion lies entirely within Canada and almost fully within the province of Alberta, but hugs the Alberta-British Columbia border from Banff northward to Jasper and Kakwa. The ecoregion is classified within the Temperate Coniferous Forests biome. Mean annual temperature in the Eastern Continental Ranges is 2.5°C, mean summer temperature is 12°C and mean winter temperature is -7.5°C. Precipitation increases from east to west and also with elevation, from 600-800 millimetres (mm) per year. Valley regions are marked by warm, dry summers and mild, snowy winters, and subalpine areas have cool, showery summers and cold, snowy winters. This region covers the Rocky Mountains of Alberta, incorporating the eastern flanks of the Continental Ranges. The major peaks cluster... More »
Eastern Canadian forests Last Updated on 2015-01-09 19:46:14 WWF Terrestrial Ecoregions Collection The Eastern Canadian forests ecoregion is distinguished from the Central Canadian Shield forests by a greater maritime influence, and a dominant tree, Balsam fir, as the climatic climax species. The Eastern Canadian forests, part of the Nearctic Realm, characterise forested land in eastern Quebec, much of Newfoundland, and disjunct occurrences in the highlands of New Brunswick, and Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia; in all, this ecoregion comprises seven major disjunctive geographic units. The ecoclimate of this ecoregion ranges from high and mid-boreal and perhumid mid-boreal to Oceanic, Atlantic, and Maritime mid-boreal. Summers are generally cool, with average temperatures ranging between 8.5°C in the north to 14.5°C in the south. Winter temperatures vary according to proximity to the ocean and... More »
Newfoundland Highland forests Last Updated on 2015-01-02 21:40:44 WWF Terrestrial Ecoregions Collection The Newfoundland highland forests ecoregion lies entirely within the island of Newfoundland. It is distinguished from the Eastern Canadian Forests by higher elevational range and rugged topography. The Newfoundland highland forests are considered within the Nearctic Realm. This area, classified within the Boreal forests/Taiga, has a mean annual temperature of 4°Celsius (C), mean summer temperature ranges from 11.5°C to 12°C and the mean winter temperature from -3.5°C to -4°C. The mean annual precipitation varies between 1000 to 1400 millimeters (mm). This region has a maritime high boreal ecoclimate, with cool summers and cold snowy winters. Rugged, steep slopes are formed of acidic, crystalline Palaeozoic and Precambrian rocks, and range from sea level to 815 metres (m) above sea level ,... More »
Mississippi River Last Updated on 2014-11-29 22:15:22 The Mississippi River drains the largest river basin in North America, and is one of the major rivers of the world. The Mississippi River watershed is the fourth largest in the world, extending from the Allegheny Mountains in the east to the Rocky Mountains in the west. The watershed includes all or parts of 31 states and two Canadian provences. The watershed measures approximately 1.2 million square miles (3.1 million square kilometers), covering about 40% of the lower 48 states. The Mississippi drains most of the United States between the Appalachian Mountains in the east and the Rocky Mountains in the West. The mainstream of the Mississippi River has headwaters rising at Lake Itasca, Minnesota and flows approximately 2340 miles (3765 km). Though the longest part of the river includes the the Missouri River which flows approximately 2540 miles (4088 km) before joining the... More »
Climate Last Updated on 2014-10-01 10:48:54 Climate is the typical pattern of conditions of the earth’s atmosphere over a given region, as defined by factors such as temperature, air pressure. humidity, precipitation, sunlight, cloudiness, and winds. The World Meteorological Organization defines climate as "the statistical description in terms of the mean and variability of relevant quantities over a period of time," where an appropriate period is typically at least thirty years. Climate can be assessed at different, overlapping geographic regions. For example, Earth is thought to have a climate that is distinct from that of other planets, while different regions of Earth are also thought to have distinct climate types. Climate is often described as the "average" conditions; however, since daily and seasonal variability (including extremes) are critical determinants, using the term... More »