Geography

Geography is the study of natural and human constructed phenomena from a spatial perspective. Geography has two main sub disciplines:

  • Human geography includes such subjects as demography, human settlements, transportation, recreation and tourism, resources, religion, social traditions, human migration, agriculture, urban systems, and economic activities
     
  • Physical geography  is concerned with the study of the Earth’s atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere from theoretical and applied viewpoints.

Sometimes the disciplines of human and physical geography combine knowledge to create a more holistic synthesis.

  • Borneo peat swamp forests Featured Article Borneo peat swamp forests Borneo peat swamp forests

    WWF Terrestrial Ecoregions Collection Although the Borneo peat swamp forests are not as biodiverse as neighbouring lowland rainforests, the... More »

  • Terrestrial biome Featured Article Terrestrial biome Terrestrial biome

    Introduction Many places on Earth share similar climatic conditions despite being found in geographically different areas. As a result of natural selection, comparable... More »

  • English Channel Featured Article English Channel English Channel

    The English Channel is that saline water body that connects the North Sea to the Celtic Sea. It is bounded on the north by England and on the south by France. This water body... More »

  • Northern California coast Featured Article Northern California coast Northern California coast

    The Northern California coast section encompasses diverse topography including mountains, hills, valleys and plains in the Northern California Coast Ranges and small parts of... More »

  • Sea of the Hebrides Featured Article Sea of the Hebrides Sea of the Hebrides

    The Sea of the Hebrides is an element of the North Atlantic Ocean, located off the western coast of Scotland, separating the Scottish mainland and the northern Inner Hebrides... More »

  • Guatemala Featured Article Guatemala Guatemala

    Guatemala is a Central American nation of fourteen million people located between Mexico, El Salvador, Honduras and Belize. Its western coast fronts to Pacific Ocean and... More »

  • Lake Urmia Featured Article Lake Urmia Lake Urmia

    Lake Urmia is a shallow perennial inland salt water body in northwestern Iran. This lake is the second largest in the Middle East, measuring roughly 5000 square kilometers in... More »

  • Don Juan Pond Featured Article Don Juan Pond Don Juan Pond

    The Don Juan Pond in western Antarctica is the most saline water body on Earth, at approximately twelve to thirteen times the salinity level of other typical seas of the world.... More »

Recently Updated
Sierra Nevada forests Last Updated on 2015-01-29 19:20:06 WWF Terrestrial Ecoregions Collection The Sierra Nevada forests are the forested areas of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, which run northwest to southwest and are approximately 650 kilometers long and 80 km wide. The range achieves its greatest height towards the south, with a number of peaks reaching heights of over 4000 meters. Several large river valleys dissect the western slope with dramatic canyons. The eastern escarpment is much steeper than the western slope, in general.   The range supports a diverse set of natural communities with many endemic species and extraordinary habitats. A significant fraction of the land area in the Sierra Nevada Mountains is unforested, since elevations above the treeline do not support even conifer growth. This ecoregion is part of the Nearctic Realm. The Sierra Nevada forests ecoregion harbors one of... More »
Eastern Cascades forests Last Updated on 2015-01-19 22:30:17 WWF Terrestrial Ecoregions Collection The Eastern Cascades forests span the eastern slopes of the Cascade Mountains in Oregon and Washington, from the southern reaches of the Cascade Mountains Leeward Forests to northern California. Vegetation is highly variable throughout this ecoregion, being influenced chiefly by edaphic processes and disturbance regimes. Several ecotones exist, particularly along the Cascade crest where western Cascade forest types overlap with eastern Cascade forests (e.g., the Wenatchee National Forest in Washington has conifer species present on both sides of the Cascades) and along the lower timberline, where forest species mix with shrub and shrub-steppe communities. This ecoregion is considered part of the Nearctic Realm, and is given the ecocode NA0512 by the World Wildlife Fund; it is within the Temperate Coniferous... More »
Snake-Columbia shrub steppe Last Updated on 2015-01-14 18:54:29 WWF Terrestrial Ecoregions Collection   The Snake-Columbia shrub steppe is a vast, mostly arid ecoregion. Its easternmost limit is the Continental Divide in eastern Idaho. From there, the ecoregion follows the arc of the Snake River Plain as far as Hell's Canyon. The ecoregion thence extends throughout southeastern Oregon, spreading along the Deschutes River catchmentCatchment is the entire area of a hydrological drainage basin. to the Columbia River. It also includes, following hydrographic lines, parts of northern Nevada and the extreme northeast of California. To the north, the ecoregion dominates the western portion of the Columbia Basin in Washington. The Snake-Columbia shrub steppe is within the Nearctic Realm. The ecoregion is largely in the rain shadow of the Cascade Mountains and thus receives little precipitation. Latitude... More »
Daugava River Last Updated on 2015-01-12 07:37:16 The Daugava River drains portions of the countries of Latvia, Belarus and Russia, prior to discharging to the Gulf of Riga. Also known as the West Dvina River, this watercourse is the fourth largest river discharging to the Baltic Sea catchment. This 1005 kilometer long river has suffered environmental damage from agricultural runoff and from hydroelectric dam construction, with major impacts dealt in the Soviet era of collective farming. In ancient history the Daugava estuary was a locus of prehistoric settlement, and later marked one of the eastern limits of the voyages of the Vikings. The lower Daugava valley (nearest the Gulf of Riga) was formed in relatively recent times, as glacial meltwater formed incision on the relatively level terrain near the Baltic Sea coast; these events occurred in the early Holocene, approximately 11,000 years before present. The relatively soft upper... More »
Central British Columbia Mountain forests Last Updated on 2015-01-06 19:04:59 WWF Terrestrial Ecoregions Collection The Central British Columbia mountain forests ecoregion in north-central British Columbia, Canada occurs as a relatively narrow band oriented in a northwest-southeast direction. It encompasses part of the Rocky Mountain trench and most of the Hart ranges of the Rocky Mountains and the Omineca Mountains. This ecoregion is within the Nearctic Realm. This ecoregion’s climate is considered Alpine and Subalpine southern Cordilleran. Mean annual temperature is around 2°C, mean summer temperature is 12°C, and mean winter temperature is between - 10°C and -7°C. Mean annual precipitation ranges from 500 to 700 millimetres, increasing from the northwest toward the southeast, and with elevation from east to west in the south. Climatic conditions in the valleys are characterised by warm, dry summers... More »