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Wildlife Management

The focus of wildlife management activities is to conserve, manage, and restore fish, wildlife, and plant resources--and their habitats.

  • Sea Turtle Rescue: Southern Texas Featured Article Sea Turtle Rescue: Southern Texas Sea Turtle Rescue: Southern Texas

    ?Main Image: Bundled against the cold, volunteers searched for stranded sea turtles along the shore to transport to rehabilitation centers. Photo by Seth Patterson, Gorgas Science... More »

  • Anaplasmosis Featured Article Anaplasmosis Anaplasmosis

    Anaplasmosis is a tickborne disease caused by the bacterium Anaplasma phagocytophilum. It was previously known as human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE) and has more recently... More »

  • Imported Red Fire Ant Enemies Featured Article Imported Red Fire Ant Enemies Imported Red Fire Ant Enemies

    ?Main Image:  A phorid fly (left), Pseudacteon cultellatus, about 1 mm long, and a red imported fire ant (right), Solenopsis invicta, about 3 mm long. The fly can lay eggs... More »

  • Oldest Known Wild Bird in U.S. Featured Article Oldest Known Wild Bird in U.S. Oldest Known Wild Bird in U.S.

    Oldest Known Wild Bird in U.S. Returns to Midway to Raise Chick The oldest known U.S. wild bird—a coyly conservative 60—is a new mother. The bird, a Laysan... More »

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Antipodes Subantarctic Islands tundra Last Updated on 2014-04-10 14:22:39 This ecoregion consists of five island groups spread out across the Southern Ocean: Bounty Islands, Auckland Islands, Antipodes Islands, Campbell Island, and Macquarie Island. Their remote location means they are critically important as resting and breeding areas for thousands of marine mammals and millions of seabirds. Biological and geological values are outstanding, with the islands boasting a highly endemic plant flora and a range of endemic and endangered birds. All of the islands are Nature Reserves and listed as World Heritage Sites, but introduced animals, especially mammalian predators, are of serious concern. Scattered throughout the Southern Ocean, these islands range from the cold temperate zone (Macquarie Island) to the cool temperate zone, where the rest of the islands lie. All the islands are situated between the Antarctic and Sub-tropical Convergences. Area,... More »
Comment on Proposal to Remove ESA Protection for Gray Wolves Last Updated on 2011-08-29 00:00:00 Proposal to Remove ESA Protection for Gray Wolves in Western Great Lakes DPS and the National Wolf Strategy Comment Period Reopens from August 26 to September 26, 2011 The Fish and Wildlife Service is reopening the comment period on the proposal to delist the Gray Wolf Western Great Lakes DPS because it has additional information regarding its recognition of the eastern wolf (Canis lycaon) as a separate species that it would like the public to review and comment on. The new information includes a manuscript prepared by Service biologists—"An Account of the Taxonomy of North American Wolves from Morphological and Genetic Analyses" (link below). In addition the Service is letting the public know that it is considering concluding the proposed rule with two or more final rules. Aug. 25, 2011 News Release: Fish and Wildlife Service Reopens... More »
Anaplasmosis Last Updated on 2011-03-22 00:00:00 Anaplasmosis is a tickborne disease caused by the bacterium Anaplasma phagocytophilum. It was previously known as human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE) and has more recently been called human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA). Anaplasmosis is transmitted to humans by tick bites primarily from the black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis) and the western black-legged tick (Ixodes pacificus). Of the four distinct phases in the tick life-cycle (egg, larvae, nymph, adult), nymphal and adult ticks are most frequently associated with transmission of anaplasmosis to humans. Typical symptoms include: fever, headache, chills, and muscle aches.  Usually, these symptoms occur within 1-2 weeks of a tick bite. Anaplasmosis is initially diagnosed based on symptoms and clinical presentation, and later confirmed by the use of specialized laboratory tests.  The first line treatment... More »
Sea Turtle Rescue: Southern Texas Last Updated on 2011-03-14 00:00:00 ?Main Image: Bundled against the cold, volunteers searched for stranded sea turtles along the shore to transport to rehabilitation centers. Photo by Seth Patterson, Gorgas Science Foundation used with permission Over 1000 Sea Turtles Rescued by Volunteers in Southern Texas Freezing temperatures in early February caused approximately 1600 endangered green sea turtles to wash ashore on and around South Padre Island, Texas. The cold-blooded marine reptiles suffered from a condition called ‘cold-stunning’ which resembles a comatose state in response to the sudden drop in temperature. Cold-stunned turtles are unable to swim and are vulnerable to boat strikes, predators and stranding. Dozens of volunteers quickly responded to the stranding event. Among them were members of the Rio Grande Chapter of the Texas Master Naturalists, sponsored by NOAA’s Texas Sea... More »
Oldest Known Wild Bird in U.S. Last Updated on 2011-03-08 00:00:00 Oldest Known Wild Bird in U.S. Returns to Midway to Raise Chick The oldest known U.S. wild bird—a coyly conservative 60—is a new mother. The bird, a Laysan albatross named Wisdom, was spotted a few weeks ago with a chick by John Klavitter, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist and the deputy manager of the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. The bird has sported and worn out 5 bird bands since she was first banded by U.S. Geological Survey scientist Chandler Robbins in 1956 as she incubated an egg. Chandler rediscovered Wisdom in 2001. In 1956, he estimated Wisdom to be at least 5 years old then since this is the earliest age at which these birds breed, though they more typically breed at 8 or 9 after an involved courtship lasting several years.  This means, of course, that Wisdom is likely to be in her early sixties. There must be something to... More »