Environmental Anthropology

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  • Medieval Warm Period Featured Article Medieval Warm Period Medieval Warm Period

    The Medieval Warm Period (MWP) refers to a time interval between AD 900 and 1300 in which some Northern Hemisphere regions were warmer than during the period known as the... More »

  • Atlantic period Featured Article Atlantic period Atlantic period

    The Atlantic period is a post-Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) European climate regime. This refers to the period from about 6,000-3,000 BC that spans most of the warmest postglacial... More »

  • Poverty and National Parks Featured Article Poverty and National Parks Poverty and National Parks

      Many poor people live around national parks in developing countries. Does that mean that these parks are contributing to their poverty? Living on the Edge of... More »

  • English Channel Featured Article English Channel English Channel

    The English Channel is that saline water body that connects the North Sea to the Celtic Sea. It is bounded on the north by England and on the south by France. This water body... More »

Recently Updated
Wheat Last Updated on 2014-05-21 15:51:12 Wheat is any of a number of species of the genus Triticum within the grass family of Poaceae. Wheat is an important grain food crop supplying the second highest caloric intake for humans, closely behind rice. Wheat is used to produce flour for bread, pasta, couscous and other foods. However, wheat generally consumes large amounts of nitrate and other fertilizers, so that the outcome of widespread wheat farming is often associated with extensive water pollution impacts, expecially related to nitrate laden runoff. Wheat is one of the earliest cultivated crops, and has a clear association with the emergence of sedentary agriculture around twelve millennia ago. Products Made From Wheat: 1.  Crossaint; 2.  Wheat Flour; 3. Noodles; 4. Wheat Dalia; 5.  Sewai; 6.  Refined Wheat Flour; 7.  Common Brown Bread; 8. ... More »
Astronomy of Christmas Last Updated on 2014-01-02 16:06:37 The astronomy of Christmas is chiefly centered around verifiable celestial events that occurred at or near the time of birth of Jesus. Astromers have expended considerable research on reconstructing movements of planets, stars and comets that could best explain Biblical accounts of the era. The Christian New Testament Gospel of Matthew, includes description of three "Maji" from the east who follow the Star of Bethlehem to the location where they find Jesus shortly after his birth. For example, the Gospel of Matthew, Chapter 2, verse 1 of the New International Version of the Bible gives: After Jesus was born in Bethlehem in Judea, during the time of King Herod, Magi from the east came to Jerusalem and asked, “Where is the one who has been born king of the Jews? We saw his star when it rose and have come to worship him." Movements of celestial bodies in this era... More »
Black Sea Last Updated on 2013-09-21 16:00:44 The Black Sea is a Mediterranean sea, centered at approximately 35o E and 44o N; it is considered the world’s largest inland water basin, although technically it is connected to the world's oceans via the Bosporus and the Dardanelles. It has a surface area of about 461,000 km2 and a volume of 537,000 km3 with a mean depth of around 1200 to 1300 metres (m), although depths greater than 2000 m are common in the central basin.  The western part of the Black Sea is a wide shelf that gradually narrows to the south and breaks at around 100-150 m. In the rest of the basin the shelf doesn’t exceed 10 to 15 kilometres in width. It is connected to the Sea of Marmara via the narrow (760 m wide) and shallow (27.5 m maximum depth) Bosporus Straits, and further connects to the Mediterranean Sea via the long and narrow Dardanelles. It is also connected to the Sea of Azov to... More »
Labrador Innu land claims and the indigenous archaeology paradox Last Updated on 2013-09-05 13:58:35 Though several indigenous groups within Canada and North America have historically been exploited during the land claims process, the lack of treaties, the discovery of myriad natural resources, the hydroelectric potential, and the superimposition of provincial boundaries upon “traditional” territory have left the Innu of Interior Labrador (Nitassinan) in a uniquely challenging situation, both with regards to land claims and maintaining their autonomy. In recent years, the Innu of Nitassinan have initiated archaeological research to document sites important to their cultural heritage before they are destroyed in industrial development projects, to provide long standing evidence of land tenure to aide in land claim struggles, and even in what could be deemed “life projects” to help educate their youth. Arguably, such projects were instrumental in bridging the gap... More »
Anthropocene Last Updated on 2013-09-03 12:23:40 The Anthropocene defines Earth's most recent geologic time period as being human-influenced, or anthropogenic, based on overwhelming global evidence that atmospheric, geologic, hydrologic, biospheric and other earth system processes are now altered by humans. The word combines the root "anthropo", meaning "human" with the root "-cene", the standard suffix for "epoch" in geologic time. The Anthropocene is distinguished as a new period either after or within the Holocene, the current epoch, which began approximately 10,000 years ago (about 8000 BC) with the end of the last glacial period. Anthropocene is a new term, proposed in 2000 by Nobel Prize winning scientist Paul Crutzen. A similar term, Anthrocene, was coined by Andrew Revkin in his 1992 book Global Warming: Understanding the Forecast, but was not adopted by scientists.... More »