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Life and Death

Most organisms are sensitive to the environmental perturbations that they already have experienced as a result of climate change.

Polar bear mother and cub on an iceflow.

Scott Schielbe, US Fish & Wildlife Service

 Biosphere

 Ecosystem Disturbance

 Species Shifts

 

  • Life from the Skies? Featured Article Life from the Skies? Life from the Skies?

      ?Main Image Explanation: What's that behind Titan? It's another of Saturn's moons: Tethys. The robotic Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn captured the... More »

  • Climate Change Escape Routes Featured News Article Climate Change Escape Routes Climate Change Escape Routes

    One if by Land, Two if by Sea? Climate Change "Escape Routes" Similar movement rates needed for animals and plants on land and in the oceans One if by land, two if by... More »

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Climate Change Escape Routes Last Updated on 2011-11-04 00:00:00 One if by Land, Two if by Sea? Climate Change "Escape Routes" Similar movement rates needed for animals and plants on land and in the oceans One if by land, two if by sea? Results of a study published in the Science [Science Magazine, 4 November 2011] show how fast animal and plant populations would need to move to keep up with recent climate change effects in the ocean and on land. The answer: at similar rates. The study was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF), and performed in part through the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis. "That average rates of environmental change in the oceans and on land are similar is not such a surprise," says Henry Gholz, program director in NSF's Division of Environmental Biology. "But averages deceive," Gholz says, "and this study shows that rates of change are at times ... More »
Life from the Skies? Last Updated on 2011-02-06 00:00:00   ?Main Image Explanation: What's that behind Titan? It's another of Saturn's moons: Tethys. The robotic Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn captured the heavily cratered Tethys slipping behind Saturn's atmosphere-shrouded Titan late last year. The largest crater on Tethys, Odysseus, is easily visible on the distant moon. Titan shows not only its thick and opaque orange lower atmosphere, but also an unusual upper layer of blue-tinted haze. Tethys, at about 2 million kilometers distant, was twice as far from Cassini as was Titan when the above image was taken. In 2004, Cassini released the Hyugens probe which landed on Titan and provided humanity's first views of the surface of the Solar System's only known lake-bearing moon. Did Life Fall from the Skies? Lessons from Titan "… we are children equally of the earth and the sky."... More »