Biosphere

Climate and the biosphere, the living part of Earth, have an intimate relationship that alters primary production and water use.

Magnitude and distribution of global primary production, both oceanic (mg/m3 chlorophyll a) and terrestrial (normalized difference land vegetation index).

SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center & ORBIMAGE

 Gaia Hypothesis

 Primary Productivity

 Water Use

 

  • Climate Change Escape Routes Featured News Article Climate Change Escape Routes Climate Change Escape Routes

    One if by Land, Two if by Sea? Climate Change "Escape Routes" Similar movement rates needed for animals and plants on land and in the oceans One if by land, two if by... More »

Recently Updated
Mammal Last Updated on 2014-10-15 22:58:09   Mammalia is a group of warm-blooded, air breathing vertebrates. With the common name mammal, each species is endowed with the characteristic of fur and three-boned middle ear; but the most remarkable element of group identity is an advanced brain element known as the neocortex, that functions as a center of complex cognition; no species except mammals have this well defined brain structure. Having pronounced inherent sexual dimorphism, the females have mammary glands capable of producing milk. There are approximately 5400 described mammalian species comprising around 1200 genera. Mammals span a size range from the three centimeter Bumblebee Bat to the 33 meter long Blue Whale. Feeding habits vary widely among species, including carnivores and insectivores who prey on animals, to frugivores and granivores who eat fruit or seeds. Earliest mammals arose approximately 200 to 130... More »
Climate Change Escape Routes Last Updated on 2011-11-04 00:00:00 One if by Land, Two if by Sea? Climate Change "Escape Routes" Similar movement rates needed for animals and plants on land and in the oceans One if by land, two if by sea? Results of a study published in the Science [Science Magazine, 4 November 2011] show how fast animal and plant populations would need to move to keep up with recent climate change effects in the ocean and on land. The answer: at similar rates. The study was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF), and performed in part through the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis. "That average rates of environmental change in the oceans and on land are similar is not such a surprise," says Henry Gholz, program director in NSF's Division of Environmental Biology. "But averages deceive," Gholz says, "and this study shows that rates of change are at times ... More »