Biogeography

Biogeography is the study of the distribution of biological organisms. The scale of analysis ranges from very small micro-topography regimes to continental dimensions. Fundamental concepts in this field of study are the nature of barrier formation and response of species to their patterns of travel and migration; in particular, the presence of rivers, mountain ranges, deserts and other natural boundaries are examples of large scale barriers. Besides such major landform barriers there are soil, topographic and meteorological factors that influence the distribution of each species. In the case of smaller scale regimes that are applicable for some bacteria or limited range plant species, there are often very restricted niches; for example, certain bacteria extremophiles may be limited to such localized features as small geyser pools, and some rare plants may have a single extant colony defined specialized soils such as serpentine and narrow climatic zone. Inherent in the concept of biogeography are the processes of speciation, extinction, dispersal and migration.   

  • Douglas-fir Featured Article Douglas-fir Douglas-fir

    The Douglas-fir (scientific name: Pseudotsuga) is a genus of tree that includes ar least five species found in North America and Asia: Scientific... More »

  • Ocean acidification troubles Featured Article Ocean acidification troubles Ocean acidification troubles

    The seas in which corals and other calcifying species dwell are turning acidic, their pH slowly dropping as Earth's oceans acidify in response to increased carbon dioxide... More »

  • Big Bend National Park, United States Featured Article Big Bend National Park, United States Big Bend National Park, United States

    Big Bend National Park is one of the two National Parks located in the state of Texas, in the USA. Big Bend National Park is located in the Big Bend region along the border of... More »

  • Great Victoria Desert Featured Article Great Victoria Desert Great Victoria Desert

    WWF Terrestrial Ecoregions Collection A vast, sparsely populated region covered by dunefields and gibber plains, the Great Victoria Desert... More »

  • Daugava River Featured Article Daugava River Daugava River

    The Daugava River drains portions of the countries of Latvia, Belarus, Estonia and Russia, prior to discharging to the Gulf of Riga. Also known as the West Dvina River, this... More »

  • Mojave Desert Featured Article Mojave Desert Mojave Desert

    WWF Terrestrial Ecoregions Collection The Mojave Desert is the smallest of the four North American deserts. While the Mojave lies between the... More »

  • Cactus Featured Article Cactus Cactus

    Cactus is a family of plants that are specially adapted to survive arid conditions, most often having leaves reduced to spines, and succulent characteristics. The scientific... More »

  • Spinner dolphin Featured Article Spinner dolphin Spinner dolphin

    The Spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris), a marine mammal in the family of oceanic dolphins,  gets its name from the spinning behavior it shows when it leaps out of... More »

  • Ecoregions of Chile Featured Article Ecoregions of Chile Ecoregions of Chile

    Chile has eight ecoregions that occur entirely or partly within its borders on the mainland and three ecorgions offshore: Sechura desert Atacama... More »

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Whale Sanctuary of El Vizcaíno, Mexico Last Updated on 2014-07-10 15:39:44 The Whale Sanctuary of El Vizcaino (27° 23'-27° 59'N, 114° 30'-114° 55'W) is a World Heritage Site located in Mexico and comprises two lagoons which lie in the central part of the Baja California peninsula, between the Gulf of California and the Pacific Ocean. Forms part of the Municipality of Mulege, Bajo California Sur State. Accessible via the north-south highway. Both lagoons are situated on the west side of the peninsula, Laguna Ojo de Liebre is connected to the Bahia Sebastian Vizcaino, and Laguna San Ignacio lies east of the town of Punta Abrejos, into which Rio San Ignacio flows. Federal Decree of 6 December 1971, promulgated on 14 January 1972, declared Laguna Ojo de Liebre a marine refuge zone for whales. On 28 March 1980, the Decree was modified to include the lagoons of Manuela and Guerrero Negro. On 11 September 1972, a Decree... More »
African Convention on the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources Last Updated on 2014-07-09 16:51:53 Entry into Force: 16 June 1969 Preamble We, the Heads of State and Government of Independent African States, Fully conscious that soil, water, flora and faunal resources constitute a capital of vital importance to mankind; Confirming, as we accepted upon declaring our adherence to the Charter of the Organization of African Unity, that we know that it is our duty "to harness the natural and human resources of our continent for the total advancement of our peoples in spheres of human endeavour"; Fully conscious of the ever-growing importance of natural resources from an economic, nutritional, scientific, educational, cultural and aesthetic point of view; Conscious of the dangers which threaten some of these irreplaceable assets; Accepting that the utilization of the natural resources must aim at satisfying the needs of man according to the carrying capacity of the... More »
Eastern Carpathian beech forests Last Updated on 2014-07-08 14:27:50 Primeval beech forests of the Carpathians are comprised of ten reserves are in the eastern Carpathian Mountains, five clustered in eastern Slovakia and southwestern Ukraine near the Polish border, and five in southwest Ukraine near the point the mountains pass into Romania. These forests, classified as substantially primeval by the United Nations, are situated between 47°56’12”N to 49°05’10”N and 22°11’23”E to 24°23’35”E. 1908:    First Ukrainian forest Natural Reserve established in Stuzhytsia; 1920s:  Several Ukrainian beech forests became Protected Areas; 1968:    The Carpathian Biosphere Reserve created by Soviet Council decree 568; 1977:    The Eastern Carpathian National Park established in Slovakia 1980:    Karpatskiy National Park (50,303 ha)... More »
Lake Malawi Last Updated on 2014-07-07 18:09:35 Lake Malawi is a lacustrine freshwater body and a national park in the country of Mozambique in east Africa. Located on a peninsula between distant mountains at the southern end of Lake Malawi, this water body with its deep clear waters and varied habitats, is home to over six hundred species of cichlid fish, nearly all endemic. Their importance for the study of evolution by adaptive radiation is comparable with that of the Galapagos Islands finches. The Lake Malawi World Heritage Site was inscribed in the year 1984 by the United Nations on the World Heritage List under Natural Criteria vii, ix and x. The site is placed in the IUCN Management Category II (National Park). The Biogeographical Province is denoted: Lake Malawi  (3.29.14) The National Park is at the southern end of Lake Malawi (also called Lake Nyasa) on and around the Nankhumba Peninsula. The Park includes the... More »
Namibia Last Updated on 2014-07-07 16:10:29 Namibia is a nation of over two million people in southern Africa, bordering the South Atlantic Ocean, between Angola to the north and South Africa to the south. Namibia is mostly high plateau with the Namib Desert along the coast and the  Kalahari Desert in east. It is one of the least densly populated nations in the world. Namibia's major environmental issues include: limited natural fresh water resources; desertification; wildlife poaching; habitat fragmentation; and, land degradation which has led to few fully protected intact conservation areas. Most of the country is susceptible to prolonged periods of drought. South Africa occupied the German colony of Southwest Africa during World War I and administered it as a mandate until after World War II, when it annexed the territory. In 1966 the Marxist Southwest Africa People's... More »