Carbon capture & storage

  • Carbon Storage in the Deep Ocean Featured Article Carbon Storage in the Deep Ocean Carbon Storage in the Deep Ocean

    Earth’s oceans are vast, covering over 70% of the planet’s surface at an average depth of 3800 meters. Injecting CO2 into the deep ocean would isolate it from the... More »

  • Carbon Storage in the Earth's Crust Featured Article Carbon Storage in the Earth's Crust Carbon Storage in the Earth's Crust

    Calcium and magnesium silicon oxides, which are prevalent in certain rocks (like wollastonite, olivine, or serpentine), react spontaneously with CO2 to produce mineral... More »

  • Carbon Storage In Geological Formations Featured Article Carbon Storage In Geological Formations Carbon Storage In Geological Formations

    Video: Curt Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, focuses in this lecture on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this... More »

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Seagrasses as carbon sink Last Updated on 2012-05-22 00:00:00 Research finds that the global carbon pool in seagrass beds is as much as 19.9 billion metric tons. They are vital to understanding climate change—they can store up to twice as much carbon as the world's temperate and tropical forests. Seagrasses Can Store as Much Carbon as Forests Seagrasses are a vital part of the solution to climate change and, per unit area, seagrass meadows can store up to twice as much carbon as the world's temperate and tropical forests. So report researchers publishing a paper in the journal Nature Geoscience. The paper, "Seagrass Ecosystems as a Globally Significant Carbon Stock," is the first global analysis of carbon stored in seagrasses. The results demonstrate that coastal seagrass beds store up to 83,000 metric tons of carbon per square kilometer, mostly in the soils beneath them. As a comparison, a typical... More »
Trapping and Transporting Carbon Dioxide Last Updated on 2010-12-19 00:00:00 Proximity to energy consumers and fuel sources largely determines the placement of new electric power plants. Only some of these facilities are located in areas with ready access to geological formations or deep waters that might provide long-term CO2 storage. Widespread adoption of CO2 capture and storage therefore hinges on the ability to transport CO2 from where it is produced to where it will be stored. Several chemical properties of CO2 influence its transport. • CO2, if kept dry, is noncorrosive and compatible with pipes and storage vessels made of regular steel. In the presence of water, CO2 forms carbonic acid, which is corrosive and must be contained in resistant alloys that are several times more expensive than regular steel. • At standard temperature and pressure (0°C, 0.1 MPa), CO2 is a colorless, odorless gas that is heavier than air. (CO2 has a... More »
Keeping Carbon from Escaping: Carbon Capture and Storage Last Updated on 2010-12-16 00:00:00 Hydrocarbon fuels — be they coal, natural gas, petroleum, or biomass — release carbon dioxide (CO2) upon combustion. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) refers to the practice of collecting CO2, concentrating it, transporting it, and storing it in a manner that prevents it from mixing freely with the atmosphere. [1] Storage options include diversion into industrial processes, conversion into mineral carbonates, pumping to the depths of the oceans, and burial in deep geological formations. All phases of CCS (capture, concentration, transportation, and storage) face significant technological and economic challenges. Many aspects of CO2 capture and storage (CCS) are still at the preliminary stages of development, and this mitigation approach requires sophisticated equipment, consumes extra fuel, and puts additional constraints on the location of facilities. The additional... More »
Microbial Electrosynthesis: Carbon Dioxide and Water to Extracellular Organics Last Updated on 2010-12-11 00:00:00 This article appeared first in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology operating under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License. The article is a verbatim version of the original and is not available for edits or additions by Encyclopedia of Earth editors or authors. Companion articles on the same topic that are editable may exist within the Encyclopedia of Earth.   Microbial Electrosynthesis: Feeding Microbes Electricity To Convert Carbon Dioxide and Water to Multicarbon Extracellular Organic Compounds Abstract The possibility of providing the acetogenic microorganism Sporomusa ovata with electrons delivered directly to the cells with a graphite electrode for the reduction of carbon dioxide to organic compounds was investigated. Biofilms of S. ovata growing on... More »
Carbon Storage In Geological Formations Last Updated on 2010-11-09 00:00:00 Video: Curt Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, focuses in this lecture on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology. From UCTV and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 2009 Summer Lecture Series. Injection of CO2 into geological formations is currently the most practical option for long-term CO2 storage. The oil and gas industry routinely conducts analogous procedures for several purposes, including disposal of acid gas (natural gas contaminated with large amounts of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide) or liquid waste into spent wells, storage of natural gas in geological formations, and injection of CO2 into wells to enhance oil and gas recovery. Large commercial facilities for geological CO2 storage have been operating for several years at two sites in Salah, Algeria and Sleipner, Norway,... More »