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Storms

Cross section of a major storm. Red arrows indicate upward movement of warm air and blue arrows indicate movement of cool air.

UCAR, NOAA

  • Storms: Still Tough to Predict Featured Article Storms: Still Tough to Predict Storms: Still Tough to Predict

    On November 30, 2006, the Atlantic hurricane season of 2006 ended without a single hurricane striking the United States. Contrast this with the 2005 season, when an... More »

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Storms: Still Tough to Predict Last Updated on 2010-12-18 00:00:00 On November 30, 2006, the Atlantic hurricane season of 2006 ended without a single hurricane striking the United States. Contrast this with the 2005 season, when an unprecedented 15 hurricanes struck the United States, nearly a third of which attained category 5 status, in which winds exceed 280 km h–1 (174 mph). Worldwide, major storms—called hurricanes, typhoons, or cyclones, depending on location—numbered less than 60 in 2006, down from an annual average of about 80. Clearly, the number and severity of storms vary widely from year to year, and an understanding of the multiple factors involved in their development is necessary for accurate prediction.   North Atlantic hurricane season. The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration’s Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) Index equals the sum of squares of the 6-h maximum sustained wind... More »