Population

  • Surviving the Population Bomb Featured News Article Surviving the Population Bomb Surviving the Population Bomb

    An April 1, 2011, News Release from the University of Michigan: World population will reach 7 billion this year, prompting new concerns about whether the world will soon... More »

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Africa collection: Population Last Updated on 2013-09-03 12:19:22 Human well-being and livelihoods in Africa Empowering people and institutions in Africa: institutional and governance interlinkages   Return to the Africa Collection More »
Surviving the Population Bomb Last Updated on 2011-04-03 00:00:00 An April 1, 2011, News Release from the University of Michigan: World population will reach 7 billion this year, prompting new concerns about whether the world will soon face a major population crisis. "In spite of 50 years of the fastest population growth on record, the world did remarkably well in producing enough food and reducing poverty," said University of Michigan economist David Lam, in his presidential address at the annual meeting of the Population Association of America. Lam is a professor of economics and a research professor at the U-M Institute for Social Research. The talk is titled "How the World Survived the Population Bomb: Lessons from 50 Years of Exceptional Demographic History." In 1968, when Paul Ehrlich's book, "The Population Bomb," triggered alarm about the impact of a rapidly growing world population, growth... More »
How Hard Are We Pushing The Land? Last Updated on 2010-12-20 00:00:00 How Hard Are We Pushing The Land? 12.14.10   The global map seen above shows total consumption by region of photosynthetic plant material as a percentage of the plant material grown by region. Scientists call the plant "supply" net primary production, or NPP, and refer to the "demand" as Human Appropriation of Net Primary Production (HANPP).   We may be becoming an ever more technologically advanced society, but we remain as dependent as ever -- if not more and more so -- on the natural world that surrounds us. That is one takeaway from new NASA research that has found humans are using an increasing amount of the Earth's total land plant production each year for food, fiber, building and packaging materials and biofuels. This remains a young data record, as one of the first global measurements tied to... More »