Productivity

Climate change may enhance or diminish ecosystem productivity, depending on environmental factors such as nitrogen or water availability. CO2 enrichment initially enhances productivity, but over time (days to years) this enhancement declines, a phenomenon called CO2 acclimation. One possible cause of CO2 acclimation is progressive nitrogen limitation.

Aspen are growing under different CO2 atmospheres in the free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) site in Rheinlander, WI.

Michelle N. Tremblay & Edward B. Mondor, Georgia Southern U.

 CO2 Acclimation

 N Limitations

 Water Use

 

  • Agriculture I Featured Photo Gallery Agriculture I Agriculture I

    Humans began to cultivate food crops about 10,000 years ago. Prior to that time, hunter-gatherers secured their food as they traveled in the nearby environment. When they... More »

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