Environmental Monitoring

Acoustic Monitoring of the Ocean Climate in the Arctic Ocean (AMOC)

December 5, 2011, 2:14 pm

Acoustic Monitoring of the Ocean Climate in the Arctic Ocean (AMOC), was a 1994–1998 program whose overall objective was to develop and design an acoustic system for long–term monitoring of the ocean temperature and ice thickness in the Arctic Ocean, including the Fram Strait, for climate variability studies and global warming detection.The specific objectives included:

  • Compilation and analysis of existing ocean and sea ice data from the Arctic Ocean for use in climate and acoustic models;

  • Simulation of present and future ocean temperature, salinity and speed of sound fields, ice thickness concentration and extent in the Arctic Ocean caused by natural variability and global warming scenarios, as input to acoustic modeling;

  • Simulation of present and future basin–wide acoustic propagation using natural variability and global warming scenarios to investigate the sensitivity of acoustic methods for temperature increase detection;

  • Simulation of present and future acoustic propagation in the Fram Strait to investigate the sensitivity of acoustic methods for monitoring heat and volume fluxes in an area of strong mesoscale eddy activity; and

  • Design of an optimum acoustic monitoring system for climate change detection in the Arctic Ocean.

This article is written at a definitional level only. Authors wishing to improve this entry are inivited to expand the present treatment, which additions will be peer reviewed prior to publication of any expansion.

Further Reading

Glossary

Citation

Baum, S. (2011). Acoustic Monitoring of the Ocean Climate in the Arctic Ocean (AMOC). Retrieved from http://www.eoearth.org/view/article/149818

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