Making the Great Transformation (Conference): Participants’ Biographies and Contact Information

Series: Pardee Conference Series
Dates: November 13, 14, and 15, 2003
Location: Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future, Boston University, Boston, MA

Participants’ Biographies and Contact Information

William Anderson

Director of Graduate Studies and Associate Chair, Department of Geography; Professor of Geography and Center for Transportation Studies, Boston University
Boston University
Department of Geography
675 Commonwealth Avenue
Boston, MA 02215
E-mail

Professor Anderson began his career at Boston University as a student, teaching assistant, and research assistant. He then became a professor at McMaster University, where he later served as Director of the Institute for Energy Studies. He returned to Boston University in 1998 as Professor and chairman in the Department of Geography and Professor in the Center for Transportation Studies.

His areas of interest include economic geography; transportation studies; urban geography; energy and environmental studies; urban and regional economic modeling; interregional and international migration; international trade; and quantitative methods.

Tariq Banuri

Senior Research Director, Tellus Institute
Tellus Institute
11 Arlington Street
Boston, MA 02216-3411
E-mail
Website

Dr. Banuri’s work focuses on sustainable development policy, and includes theoretical as well as applied work in the areas of climate change, conservation strategy development, governance, institutional development for the environment, and regional cooperation for sustainable development (focusing especially on the South Asia region). He has broad experience in Pakistan in policy development through a combination of research and analysis, and organizing and leading multi-stakeholder participation.

More generally, his work has focused on conceptual as well as practical issues in sustainable development—including the analysis of macroeconomic and trade policies, institutions, governance, legal systems, and community development. He is a leading member of two of the largest professional networks in this area: the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), in which he is a convening Lead Author; and the IUCN, the World Conservation Union, where he is the elected chair of the Commission on Environmental, Economic, and Social Policy (CEESP).

Kathryn Bard

Associate Professor of Archaeology, Boston University
Boston University
Department of Archaeology
675 Commonwealth Avenue
Suite 347
Boston, MA 02215
E-mail

Professor Bard’s research interests include the late prehistory of Egypt, the origins of complex societies and early states in northeast Africa: Egypt, Nubia, and northern Ethiopia/Eritrea, and the Red Sea trading network in the Bronze and Iron Ages. She received the National Geographic Society’s Chairman’s Award for Exploration in 1998.

Professor Bard is co-director of the joint BU/IUO (Istituto Universitario Orientale di Napoli) project at Aksum, Ethiopia, which excavated a number of sites, including a large elite residence and cemetery on Bieta Giyorgis Hill to the northwest of Aksum, dating to the late first millennium BC and first millennium AD. She is also co-director (with Rodolfo Fattovich) of excavations at the Middle Kingdom port of Wadi Gawasis, on the Red Sea in Egypt.

Frank Catanzaro

Chair, Experimental Cybernode, American Council for the United Nations University Millennium Project
AC/UNU Millennium Project
P.O. Box 900
Kula, HI 96790
E-mail
Website

Frank Catanzaro is a cofounder and senior partner in the Arcturus Research & Design Group, and a charter member of the Millennium Project, where he is chair of its experimental cyber-node. Frank’s pioneering work integrating computer and communications technologies with new social inventions won a first-prize award in the Kawasaki, Japan, international design competition for Advanced Information Cities. His early pioneering work in computer-mediated communications was cited by the International Studies Association for its ground-breaking implications for transnational communications and nuclear peacekeeping.

Frank’s public sector work has included consulting on a Library of Congress study on the role of hypermedia in the future of libraries, participation in the Congressional Peace Academy hearings, and being appointed as a voting delegate to the White House conference on Libraries and Information Systems. His current work with the American Council of the United Nations University and its Millennium Project involves researching the state of the art in online collaboration tools and cyber futures. Specifically his focus is on Web services, the semantic and ontologic Web, distributed grid, mesh, and ad hoc computing as drivers for the emergence of new social and economic futures.

Richard Clapp

Professor of Environmental Health, Boston University
Boston University
School of Public Health
715 Albany Street, Talbot Building
Boston, MA 02118
E-mail

Dr. Clapp received his MPH degree from the Harvard School of Public Health in 1974. In the 1970s he worked in community and environmental health as Executive Director of the Lynn Community Health and Counseling Center and Director of the Massachusetts Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program, in the Department of Public Health. In 1980, he was hired to establish the Massachusetts Cancer Registry, and he served as its Director until 1989. During this time he completed his doctorate in epidemiology and was awarded a DSc degree from the BU School of Public Health in 1989.

For twelve years, Dr. Clapp worked as Director and then consultant at the JSI Center for Environmental Health Studies. He joined the Environmental Health Department full-time faculty in 1993, where he is now based. He currently works part time as a consultant at the Tellus Institute, a nonprofit environmental consulting organization in Boston. His research interests include the health effects of dioxin, radiation, and environmental exposures to toxic chemicals. He serves on several advisory boards and is on the Governing Council of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology. He teaches environmental epidemiology and environmental health courses, and advises graduate students.

Cutler Cleveland

Director, Center for Energy and Environmental Studies; Professor of Geography at the Center for Energy and Environmental Studies, Boston University
Boston University
Department of Geography
675 Commonwealth Avenue, Room 141
Boston, MA 02215
E-mail

Cutler Cleveland holds a BS in Ecology and Systematics from Cornell University, a MS in Marine Science from Louisiana State University, and a PhD in Geography from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He currently is the Director of the Center for Energy and Environmental Studies at Boston University, where he also holds the position of Professor in the Department of Geography and Environment. He also is Co-Director of the Project on Human Development in the Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future at Boston University. Dr. Cleveland is Editor-in-Chief of the Encyclopedia of Energy, and Editor-in-Chief of the journal Ecological Economics. Dr. Cleveland is a member of the Scientific Planning Committee for the International Human Dimensions Progamme on Global Environmental Change-Industrial Transformation. In 1992–93, he was a Lecturer in the European Economic Community’s Advanced Education Programme on the Environment, and currently is a participant in the Stanford Energy Modeling Forum. He has been a consultant to numerous private and public organizations, including the Asian Development Bank, Charles River Associates, the Technical Research Centre of Finland, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the MacArthur Foundation.

Dr. Cleveland’s research focuses on the ecological-economic analysis of how energy and materials are used to meet human needs. His research employs the use of econometric and systems dynamics models of oil supply, natural resource scarcity, and the relation between the use of energy and natural resources and economic systems. Dr. Cleveland publishes in journals such as Science, Ecological Modeling, Energy Systems and Policy, The Energy Journal, The Annual Review of Energy, Resources and Energy, The American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, The Canadian Journal of Forest Research, and Ecological Economics. He has won publication awards from the International Association of Energy Economics and the National Wildlife Federation. Recent lectures include an Expert Group Meeting on Environmental Reviews of Trade Policies, sponsored by the United Nations and the World Bank, a workshop on property rights and the performance of natural resource systems sponsored by the Beijer Institute for Ecological Economics, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and one on the Environment, Development, and Government Policy, organized by the Institute for Social Research of the Fundação Joaquim Nabuco and the Ministry of the Environment in Brazil.

Pedro Conceição

Deputy Director and Senior Policy Analyst, United Nations Development Programme
United Nations Development Programme
Office of Development Studies
336 East 45th Street, 4th Floor
New York, NY 10017
E-mail
Website

Pedro Conceição’s main interest is, specifically, on knowledge as a global public good. Prior to joining ODS, he was an assistant professor at the Technical University of Lisbon, Portugal, teaching and researching on science, technology, and innovation policy. His academic work also includes research on the relationship between technological change, economic growth and income inequality, spanning both empirical and methodological work on the measurement of inequality. He has degrees in Physics (licenciatura) and in Economics (master’s) from the Technical University of Lisbon and a PhD in Public Policy from the LBJ School of Public Affairs, the University of Texas at Austin.

Robert Costanza

Director, Gund Institute for Ecological Economics; Gund Professor of Ecological Economics, University of Vermont
University of Vermont
590 Main Street
Burlington, VT 05405-0088
E-mail

Before moving to Vermont, Robert Costanza was director of the University of Maryland Institute for Ecological Economics and a professor in the Center for Environmental Science, at Solomons, and in the Biology Department at College Park.

Dr. Costanza is cofounder and past-president of the International Society for Ecological Economics (ISEE) and was chief editor of the society’s journal, Ecological Economics, until 2002. He serves on the editorial board of eight other international academic journals. He is president of the International Society for Ecosystem Health. He was selected as a Kellogg National Fellow, was awarded the Society for Conservation Biology Distinguished Achievement Award, and was also selected as a Pew Scholar in Conservation and the Environment. He was awarded the Kenneth Boulding Memorial Award for Outstanding Contributions in Ecological Economics and received an honorary doctorate in natural sciences from Stockholm University. He has served on the Scientific Steering Committee for the LOICZ core project of the IGBP, the U.S. EPA National Advisory Council for Environmental Policy and Technology (NACEPT), the National Research Council Board on Sustainable Development, Committee on Global Change Research, the National Research Council, Board on Global Change, the U.S. National Committee for the Man and the Biosphere Program, and the National Marine Fisheries Service Committee on Ecosystem Principles. He is the author or coauthor of over 300 scientific papers and 16 books.

James Dewar

Director, The RAND Frederick S. Pardee Center for Longer Range Global Policy and the Future Human Condition; Frederick S. Pardee Professor of Long-Term Policy Analysis, The Frederick S. Pardee RAND Graduate School
The Frederick S. Pardee RAND Graduate School
1776 Main Street
Santa Monica, CA 90401-3208
E-mail

Dr. Dewar has been at RAND for 22 years. He has been a pioneer in the development of Assumption-Based Planning, a widely used strategic planning methodology. He received the Military Operations Research Society’s highest prize for Non-Monotonicity, Chaos, and Combat Models. His clients have included large corporations, institutions of higher education, and the Department of Defense. Professor Dewar is also RAND’s Director of Research Quality Assurance.

Professor Dewar received his BS from Harvey Mudd College and an MS and PhD from the University of Southern California in Mathematics.

David Fromkin

Director, Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future; Frederick S. Pardee Professor of Future Studies; University Professor; Professor of International Relations, of History, and of Law, Boston University
Boston University
67 Bay State Road
Boston, MA 02215
E-mail

Professor Fromkin served for three years as a First Lieutenant in the Judge Advocate General’s Corps, United States Army, stationed in Verdun, France, where he was a trial observer in French courts pursuant to the NATO Status of Forces Agreement. As prosecutor and defense counsel, he fought more than one hundred contested courts martial. He began his civilian career as an associate of the Wall Street law firm of Simpson, Thacher & Bartlett. After a varied career in law, business, and politics, he turned to writing works of history and studies of world politics. His shorter pieces have appeared in Foreign Affairs, the New York Times, and other publications. He is the author of seven books, including the national bestseller A Peace to End All Peace (1989), chosen by the editors of the New York Times Book Review as one of the dozen best books of the year and shortlisted for the Pulitzer Prize. His most recent book, published in March 2004, is Europe’s Last Summer: Who Started the Great War in 1914? He has been a member of the Council on Foreign Relations since 1976.

Professor Fromkin is also the Director of the Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future and the Center’s first Frederick S. Pardee Professor of Future Studies. In addition, Professor Fromkin holds appointments as a University Professor, Professor of International Relations, Professor of History, and Professor of Law. He served three years as the Director of the Center for International Relations and Chairman of the Department of International Relations at Boston University.

Sakiko Fukuda-Parr

Director, Human Development Report Office, United Nations Development Programme
United Nations Development Programme
304 East 45th Street, 12th Floor
New York, NY 10017

Sakiko Fukuda-Parr is the lead author of the Human Development Report, 2004: Identity, Cultural Diversity and Globalization. She has been director of this United Nations Development Programme flagship publication since 1995 and has worked with Nancy Birdsall, Richard Jolly, Amartya Sen, and Mahbub ul Haq in leading the last ten annual reports covering diverse themes. She has written and spoken extensively on the human development approach to development, especially on technology and development, human rights, gender, and poverty. She is editor of The Journal of Human Development. Sakiko Fukuda-Parr’s work in international development cooperation has spanned more than 25 years. In the 1980s she spearheaded UNDP’s policy work on technical cooperation effectiveness and capacity building. She lead the 1993 publication Rethinking Technical Cooperation, Reforms for Capacity Building in Africa, one of the most comprehensive reviews of technical cooperation effectiveness that offers proposals for radical reforms, and is co-editor of its 2002 revisit, Capacity for Development: Old Problems, New Solutions. Earlier, she worked on agriculture and rural development projects in North Africa and the Middle East.

John Gerring

Associate Professor of Political Science, Boston University
Boston University
Department of Political Science
232 Bay State Road
Boston, MA 02215
E-mail

Professor Gerring’s areas of specialization are comparative politics, American politics, methodology, and political theory. He is the recipient of several grants and fellowships, a member of the School of Social Science, and received the Dr. Virginia McClam Prize in International Relations at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the founder and Director of the Boston Network on International Development, a nonprofit organization promoting exchanges among members of the international development community in the greater Boston area. His publications include: Party Ideologies in America, 1828–1996, a book which traces the changing ideological content of the two major parties as they campaigned for office from the early 19th century to the present, and Social Science Methodology: A Criterial Framework, which is both a general introduction to the subject of methodology and an argument about how we might resolve methodological differences in the social sciences today. He is currently working on issues related to qualitative methodology and political history, good governance, and human development.

Jerome Glenn

Executive Director, American Council for the United Nations University; Director of the Millennium Project
United Nations University
4421 Garrison Street, NW
Washingon, DC 20016-4055
E-mail
Website

Jerome Glenn has worked for over 30 years in futures research with governments, international organizations, and private industry in science and technology policy, economics, education, defense, space, and forecasting methodology. He has worked on decision support systems with the Committee for the Future, at the Hudson Institute, and has his own firm, the Future Options Room.

In addition, Jerome Glenn has been Deputy Director of the Partnership for Productivity International, involved in national strategic planning, institutional design, training, and evaluation in economic development in Africa, the Middle East, Asia, the Caribbean, and Latin America. He founded CARINET computer network in 1983 (now owned by CGNET) and personally introduced data packet switching in 12 developing countries. He is an independent consultant for USAID contractors, World Bank, and futurist consultant for UNDP, UNU, UNESCO, US/EPA, the government of Canada, and USAID. He was also a Peace Corps Volunteer in Tuberculosis & Leprosy, Malawi.

Jerome Glenn invented the “Futures Wheel” forecasting technique and Futuristic Curriculum Development, was instrumental in the SALT II section that banned the first space weapons (Soviet FOBS), and was named by Saturday Review as among the most unusually gifted leaders of America for his pioneering work in Tropical Medicine, Future-Oriented Education, and Participatory Decision Making Systems in 1974.

John Haaga

Director of Domestic Programs, Population Reference Bureau
Population Reference Bureau
1875 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Suite 520
Washington, DC 20009-5728
E-mail
Website

Dr. Haaga directs the Population Reference Bureau’s projects that provide information on US population trends and their implications and educational activities for students and educators in American schools. Several of these projects are funded by the Annie E. Casey Foundation supporting the KIDS COUNT network of child advocates, and a collaborative project with the Russell Sage Foundation to publish a series of Census 2000 Bulletins. He served as director for PRB’s MEASURE Communication project.

Dr. Haaga is currently Secretary-Treasurer of the Population Association of America. He teaches in the School of Public Affairs at the University of Maryland, and has also taught courses in public policy at Georgetown University and the Defense Intelligence College. Before joining PRB, he was the staff director of the Committee on Population at the National Academy of Sciences, where he developed and implemented research projects on both US and international population issues. He has also directed a large research project for the Population Council in Bangladesh to improve family planning programs, worked as a health policy analyst for RAND, and was deputy director of the Nutritional Surveillance Program at Cornell University.

Syed A. Hasnath

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Geography, Boston University
Boston University
Department of Geography
675 Commonwealth Avenue
Boston, MA 02215
E-mail

Professor Hasnath’s primary areas of interest are political geography and urban planning. He received a BA and an MA from Rajshahi University (India) and an MS from the University of Wales. He holds an MURP from Bangladesh University of Engineering and a PhD from Boston University.

Barry Hughes

Professor of International Studies, University of Denver
University of Denver
Graduate School of International Studies
Denver, CO 80208
E-mail

Before becoming Professor at the Graduate School of International Studies at the University of Denver, Dr. Hughes taught for ten years at Case Western Reserve University. His principal research interests are in the areas of world politics; computer simulation models for economic, energy, food, population, environmental, and socio-political forecasting; policy analysis; and global futures. He is the creator of a computer simulation called International Futures for the study of long-term issues by students and policy makers.

Dr. Hughes has consulted for the governments of Germany, Iran, Egypt, the US, and the European Union. He has taught courses in Costa Rica and China. His publications include The Domestic Context of American Foreign Policy (1978), World Modeling (1980), World Futures (1985), Disarmament and Development (1990), Continuity and Change in World Politics (1991, 1994, 1997, 2000), and International Futures (1993, 1996, 1999), as well as numerous articles.

Robert Kaufmann

Director of Graduate Studies, Center for Energy and Environmental Studies; Professor of Geography at the Center for Energy and Environmental Studies, Boston University
Boston University
CAS Geography
675 Commonwealth Avenue, Room 141
Boston, MA 02215
E-mail

Professor Kaufmann’s areas of interest include world oil markets, global climate change, and ecological economics. His current research focuses on land-use change in China; temporal and radiative forcing; carbon sink appendix; the temporal relation between radiative forcing and surface temperature; and time series analysis of emissions, concentrations, and temperature. Before coming to Boston University, Professor Kaufmann was a senior economist in the Energy Department at Wharton Econometrics and a research scientist in the Complex Systems Research Center at the University of New Hampshire. He has published numerous articles and has coauthored three books.

Laura MacLatchy

Assistant Professor of Anthropology
Boston University
Department of Anthropology
232 Bay State Road, Room 104B
Boston, MA 02215
E-mail

Laura MacLatchy is interested in the evolution of ape and human locomotor adaptations. She has been active in the study and recovery of fossil primates, as well as in the analysis of the morphology and locomotion of living primates. Her field experience includes paleontological work in Chad, Egypt, Kenya, Malawi, Pakistan, and Uganda and behavioral studies in Ecuador.

She currently directs a multidisciplinary paleontological project in Eastern Uganda, and her interest in locomotor evolution has also led to a study of suspensory and upright behaviors in ateline primates at the Tiputini Biodiversity Field Station in Ecuador, which Boston University co-operates with the Universidad San Fransico de Quito.

Dr. MacLatchy teaches courses in human and primate evolution and anatomy.

Joachim Maître

Director of Military Education; Director of the Center for Defense Journalism; Professor of Journalism and of International Relations; Chairman, Department of International Relations, Boston University
Boston University
Department of International Relations
152 Bay State Road, Room 110
Boston, MA 02215
E-mail

Professor Maître has been a lecturer for the University of Nigeria, a freelance correspondent and Editor for Die Welt, Chairman and Associate Professor of German at McGill University, the Editor of Die Welt des Buches, a Press and Olympic Attaché for the Olympic Games of 1976, and editor-in-chief of Die Welt am Sontag, the Axel Springer Verlag, and the Ullstein Buchverlag. He has been a national fellow at the Hoover Institution (Stanford University) and a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow. He is a specialist both in security affairs and in reporting on security affairs, and teaches in the College of Communication’s Department of Journalism as well as in International Relations. He is the founder and Director of Boston University’s Center for Defense Journalism, and is the Editor of the Center’s journal, Defense Media Review. He is also the Director of the Division of Military Education, which oversees Boston University’s Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) programs.

Adil Najam

Associate Professor of International Relations and Diplomacy, The Fletcher School, Tufts University
Tufts University
The Fletcher School
International Negotiations and Diplomacy
Cabot 5th Floor
Medford, MA 02155
E-mail

In addition to teaching at Tufts, Professor Najam has also taught at MIT, UMass-Boston, and the School for International Training. In 1997 he was the winner of both the MIT Goodwin Medal for Effective Teaching and the International Political Science Association’s Stien Rokan Award. He is Director of the Board of Governors of the Pakistan Institute for Environment-Development Action Research, on the International Advisory Board at the Center for Global Studies at the University of Victoria, and a member of the International Advisory Board of the Pakistan Center for Trade and Sustainable Development. Professor Najam is an editorial board member of Ecological Economics, Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Yearbook of International Co-operation on Environment and Development, and Annual Editions: Environment. In addition, he was Chapter Lead Author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in 2001.

His primary research interests are in international multilateral negotiation; sustainable development; human development and human security; international environmental politics with a particular focus on developing countries; global climate change policy; trade and environment; and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in international development.

David Ozonoff

Principal Investigator, Superfund Basic Research Center; Director, Program in Public Health Preparedness; Professor of Environmental Health, Boston University
Boston University
School of Public Health
715 Albany Street, T-2 East
Boston, MA 02118
E-mail

Before coming to Boston University in 1977, Professor Ozonoff taught and did research work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he was a Mellon Fellow. He was also a Macy Fellow in the History of Medicine and the Biological Sciences at Harvard.

In 1977, he moved to Boston University where he became the first chair of the Department of Environmental Health in the new School of Public Health. His research work centers on health effects to communities of various kinds of toxic exposures, especially from hazardous waste sites, new mathematical approaches to understanding the results of small case-control studies, and the use of scientific evidence in court. He has been principal or co-investigator of a number of major studies of waste sites, including the Silresim Superfund site and a large case-control study of cancer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. As Director of the Superfund Basic Research Program, a multidisciplinary effort to understand basic scientific problems connected with the Federal Superfund Program funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, he oversees the Center’s administrative and outreach cores, is principal investigator of his own project involving new methods to use maps in environmental epidemiology, and coordinates the work of eight other senior investigators and their projects. He is also PI of a Cooperative Agreement with CDC and ATSDR to devise an instrument to assess environmental stress on children in communities with toxic exposure problems. He also works with the Center for Discrete Mathematics and Theoretical Computer Science at Rutgers University on a Special Focus effort to bring mathematicians together with epidemiologists.

In partnership with Philippe Grandjean, he is co-Editor-in-Chief of a new online journal, Environmental Health, and serves on the editorial boards of several other journals. He is an elected Fellow of the Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars and a Fellow of the Collegium Ramazzini. In 2002 he received the Scientist for the Public Good Award from the Clean Water Action Alliance of Massachusetts.

Frederick S. Pardee

Special Guest

A native of Massachusetts, Frederick S. Pardee received both a bachelor’s and a master’s degree from the Boston University School of Management in 1954. He worked for 13 years at the RAND Corporation as a systems analyst, studying long-term economic forecasts. He then spent several years working as an independent consultant, primarily for the government. In 1974, he turned his professional attention to managing his real estate investments while actively maintaining his interest in analyzing the future as a hobby.

Through Mr. Pardee’s generous endowment, Boston University has established the Pardee Professorship and Visiting Professorship in Future Studies to focus on the long-term effect of the future on lifestyle and social trends. In recognition of his interest and knowledge in the area of future studies, Boston University has dedicated the Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future.

Nathan Phillips

Director of Undergraduate Studies, Department of Geography; Assistant Professor of Geography, Boston University
Boston University
675 Commonwealth Avenue
Boston, MA 02215
E-mail

Professor Phillips’s research focuses on global change biology, plant physiological ecology, scaling eco-physical processes, fractal treatment of forest structure and consequences for mass/energy transfer, tree physiology, and hydraulic architecture. His current projects include global vegetation height prediction based on hydraulic constraints, separating gravity from path length in constraining plant height using model organisms (palms, lianas), effects of age class on forest function, and constructing a canopy access facility for research and education in a New England forest. He has served as principal investigator on several different projects, the most recent being on environmental data acquisition and communications improvements at Sargent Center, New Hampshire.

James Post

Professor, DBA Program; Faculty Director, DBA Program, Department of Strategy and Policy, Boston University
Boston University
School of Management
595 Commonwealth Avenue
Boston, MA 02215
E-mail

Professor Post’s research interests include public affairs management, corporate citizenship—issues and strategies, nonprofit management—strategies and public accountability, governance in business, and government and nonprofit organizations. His most recent publications include Business and Society: Corporate Strategy, Public Policy, Ethics, 10th edition (with Anne T. Lawrence and James Weber, 2002) and Redefining the Corporation: Stakeholder Management and Organizational Wealth (with Lee Preston and Sybille Sachs, 2002).

Robert Prescott-Allen

Consultant
E-mail

Robert Prescott-Allen is a consultant in sustainable development based in Victoria, B.C. He is a member of the World Conservation Union’s International Assessment Team and of the Expert Group on Indicators of Sustainable Development for the UN Commission on Sustainable Development. He is the author of The Wellbeing of Nations, a survey of 180 countries and the first global assessment of sustainability.

Robert Prescott-Allen was the Senior Consultant and Writer for the International Union for the Conservation of Nature’s sequel to the World Conservation Strategy, Caring for the Earth: A Strategy for Sustainable Living, published in partnership with the United Nations Environment Program and the World Wide Fund for Nature in 1991. Subsequently he has been applying the principles espoused in the strategy at the regional and local level including the Province of British Columbia.

Iqbal Quadir

Adjunct Lecturer, Public Policy, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University
Harvard University
79 John F. Kennedy Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Professor Quadir is a Fellow at Harvard’s Center for Business and Government and a Visiting Fellow at the Center for Business Innovation at Cap Gemini Ernst & Young. He is the founder of GrameenPhone, which provides telephone access throughout Bangladesh, including to its rural poor, by adding cellular telephony to village-based micro-enterprise. He was named a Global Leader for Tomorrow by the World Economic Forum based in Davos, Switzerland, in 1999. He has served as a vice president of Atrium Capital Corp., and was an associate at Security Pacific Merchant Bank and Coopers & Lybrand, and he has also been a consultant to the World Bank in Washington, DC.

Iqbal Quadir holds an MBA and an MA from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, and a bachelor’s degreee with honors from Swarthmore College.

Paul Raskin

Director, SEI-Boston; President, Tellus Institute
The Tellus Institute
11 Arlington Street
Boston, MA 02216-3411
E-mail
Website

Dr. Raskin’s work focuses on illuminating the requirements for a transition to sustainability at global, regional, and national levels. By blending economic, environmental, and social dimensions into an integrated assessment framework, he examines the risks and opportunities of alternative development strategies. To advance sustainability methods and build capacity, Dr. Raskin has developed and disseminated such widely used models as the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) system, the Water Evaluation and Planning (WEAP) system, and PoleStar, a comprehensive framework for exploring alternative global, regional, and national scenarios.

He has conducted projects throughout the world for numerous governmental and non-governmental organizations, foundations, and multinational agencies such as the United Nations, World Bank, and OECD. He has been a member of the Board on Sustainable Development of the US National Academy of Sciences, a lead author for the International Panel on Climate Change, and an expert advisor to the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment and the Convention on Biodiversity. In 1995, he organized the Global Scenario Group, an international and interdisciplinary body whose work has guided numerous international assessments of social and environmental futures such as the UNEP’s Global Environmental Outlook. Dr. Raskin has published numerous articles and books. He was lead author on the Global Scenario Group’s 2002 synthetic essay, “Great Transition: The Promise and Lure of the Times Ahead.”

Dr. Raskin received a BA in Physics from the University of California at Berkeley in 1964 and a PhD in Theoretical Physics from Columbia University in 1970. He taught at the university level until founding the Tellus Institute in 1976.

Peter Saundry

Executive Director, National Council for Science and the Environment
National Council for Science and the Environment
1707 H Street, NW, Suite 200
Washington, DC 20006
E-mail
Website

Since 1993 Dr. Saundry has been the Executive Director of the National Council for Science and the Environment, a nonpartisan organization of scientists, environmentalists, business people, and policy makers working to improve the scientific basis of environmental decision making.

Dr. Saundry is also Treasurer of Global Children’s Health and Environment Fund (GCHEF), a nonprofit international organization based in Washington, DC. In 1995, he was elected to the World Academy of Art and Science. He has also served as a Congressional Science Fellow with the US Senate Appropriations Committee, has chaired the Sierra Club Clean Coastal Waters Task Force in Los Angeles, CA, and was a member of the Management Committee for the Santa Monica Bay Restoration Project, a part of EPA’s National Estuaries Program.

Dr. Saundry received a PhD in Physics from the University of Southern California in 1991, an MS in Physics from Adelphi University in 1984, and a BS in Physics, with honors, from Southampton University, UK, in 1982.

Douglas Starr

Co-director, Science Journalism Program; Associate Professor, Department of Journalism, Boston University
Boston University
College of Communication
640 Commonwealth Avenue
Boston, MA 02215
E-mail

Professor Starr is the author of Blood: An Epic History of Medicine and Commerce, which won the 1998 Los Angeles Times Book Prize and was named to the “Best Books of 1998” lists of Publishers Weekly, Booklist, and Library Journal. A veteran science, medical, and environmental reporter, he has contributed to many national publications, including Smithsonian, Audubon, National Wildlife, Sports Illustrated, Los Angeles Times, Christian Science Monitor, and Time. He has served as a science editor for PBS-TV and is currently working on a Public Television documentary based on his book. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Rutgers University and received his master’s from Boston University.

Ian Sue Wing

Assistant Professor of Geography; Center for Energy and Environmental Studies, Boston University
Boston University
Department of Geography
675 Commonwealth Avenue
Room 141
Boston, MA 02215
E-mail

Dr. Ian Sue Wing is an Assistant Professor in the Geography Department at Boston University (BU), and a research affiliate of the Center for Energy and Environmental Studies at BU and the Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He holds a PhD in Technology, Management and Policy from MIT and a MSc in Economics from Oxford University, where he was the 1994 Commonwealth Caribbean Rhodes Scholar. Dr. Sue Wing conducts research and teaching on the economic analysis of energy and environmental policy, with an emphasis on climate change and computational general equilibrium (CGE) analysis of economies’ adjustment to macroeconomic shocks. His current research includes investigation of the sources of long-run change in the energy intensity of the US economy, the theoretical and empirical performance of absolute versus intensity-based emission limits under economic and environmental uncertainties, the implications of trade-mediated international productivity spillovers for global carbon emissions and leakage, and the performance of different methods of representing endogenous technological change in CGE models for climate change policy analysis. He is currently supported by a grant from the Department of Energy’s Office of Science.

Strom Thacker

Associate Professor, Department of International Relations, Boston University
Boston University
Department of International Relations
152 Bay State Road
Boston, MA 02215
E-mail

Professor Thacker’s areas of expertise are international and comparative political economy, governance, development, Latin American studies, and Mexican political economy and politics. His research and teaching focus broadly on questions of political economy and development, with particular emphasis on Mexico and Latin America, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), governance, and human development. His recent books include Big Business, the State, and Free Trade: Constructing Coalitions in Mexico (2000), and Good Government: A Centripetal Theory of Democratic Governance (forthcoming). He is also working on projects on state capacity, and democracy and human development. He has published articles in the British Journal of Political Science, Business and Politics, International Organization, the Journal of Interamerican Studies and World Affairs, and World Politics. He also has an ongoing interest in the politics of foreign aid and lending, and the International Monetary Fund. He is a Faculty Affiliate of the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies at Harvard University and a Fellow at the Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future at Boston University. He has been a Susan Louise Dyer Peace Fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution and a Fulbright Scholar. He has also received grants funded by BU’s Pardee Center, the Mellon Foundation, the Tinker Foundation, and the University of North Carolina. He taught at the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México before his appointment to Boston University.

James Tracy

Former Headmaster, Boston University Academy
E-mail

Tracy taught history for six years at the private Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, CT., before becoming Headmaster of BU Academy. From 1994 to 1995 he was a visiting fellow in Yale University’s history department. He has also taught history courses at UMass-Boston.

A native of Boston, Tracy received a bachelor’s degree in history and religion from UMass-Boston in 1984 and a PhD in American history from Stanford University in 1993. His 1996 book, Direct Action: Radical Pacifism From the Union Eight to the Chicago Seven (1996), was nominated for the American Historical Association’s award for best book of the year in American history and is currently being adapted into a documentary film.

Curtis Woodcock

Professor of Geography; Center for Energy and Environmental Studies, Boston University
Boston University
Department of Geography
675 Commonwealth Avenue
Boston, MA 02215
E-mail

Professor Woodcock’s primary interests are remote sensing, ecosystem science, and land use. His current research includes the monitoring of forest change and its implication on terrestrial carbon budgets, urbanization as a component of global change, the influence of forest canopy structure on canopy gap structure, and radiation transmission and the validation of terrestrial remote sensing products.

Before coming to Boston University in 1984, Professor Woodcock was a research Associate at Hunter College at the City University of New York and at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and was a part of the NASA Graduate Researchers Program at the Johnson Space Center. At BU, he has served as Acting Director for the Center for Remote Sensing and Chair of the Department of Geography. He is currently Director of Geographic Applications for the Center for Remote Sensing and a Research Fellow in the Department of Cognitive and Neural Systems.

Fareed Zakaria

Editor, Newsweek International
Newsweek International
251 W. 57th Street
New York, NY 10019

Fareed Zakaria is editor of Newsweek International. He also writes a column that appears in the national edition of Newsweek, Newsweek International and, often, The Washington Post, making it one of the most widely circulated columns of its kind in the world.

He is the author of The Future of Freedom: Illiberal Democracy at Home and Abroad (2003), a book on global political trends, and From Wealth to Power, a provocative examination of America’s role on the world stage, which has been translated into several languages. He is co-editor of The American Encounter: The United States and the Making of the Modern World. He is a former managing editor of Foreign Affairs. Zakaria recently joined the ABC television show “This Week” and also appears as an analyst on several other ABC News programs. In addition, he has been a guest on such programs as “Charlie Rose,” “Firing Line,” “The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer,” “The McLaughlin Group,” “BBC World News,” and “Meet the Press.”

Zakaria has written for The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The New Yorker, and was the wine columnist for Slate. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Overseas Press Club Award, the National Press Club’s Edwin Hood Award, the Deadline Club Award for Best Columnist, and a lifetime achievement award from the South Asian Journalists Association.

Andrew Zolli

Founder, Z + Partners
Z + Partners
221 5th Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11215

Andrew Zolli founded Z + Partners in 2001. He is a forecaster, design strategist, and author. He is a Futurist in Residence at Popular Science, and a contributor to Wired and NPR’s Marketplace. He is also the Chair of the annual Pop!Tech conference. He edited the Catalog of Tomorrow (2002). His next book, In Good Company, is forthcoming. He is a network member of the Global Business Network, and was recently named a Visiting Fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Foundation.

Andrew Zolli is the former Chief Marketing Officer of Siegel & Gale. He has served as an advisor to such varied companies as TRUSTe, the leading Internet privacy organization, and The Doctors’ Company, a leading healthcare insurance concern. He currently advises the communications technology firm Brand Experience Lab, the longevity research foundation the Methuselah Mouse Prize, and Ludicorp, an Internet game development company, among many others. Zolli speaks and writes widely on the subjects of technology, design, social issues, and long-term forecasting. He has edited several books on new technology and his work, ideas, and writing have appeared in publications such as the New York Times, Wired, I.D., The Industry Standard, Eye magazine, and on National Public Radio.

He is currently a visiting lecturer in Clark University’s Graduate School of Management, where he teaches courses on branding, design strategy, and communications. He is a past board member of the American Institute of Graphic Arts’ New York chapter.



This is a chapter from Making the Great Transformation (Conference).
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Glossary

Citation

Longer-Range, F. (2008). Making the Great Transformation (Conference): Participants’ Biographies and Contact Information. Retrieved from http://www.eoearth.org/view/article/154374

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